Roman emperors

IDES OF MARCH: JULIUS CAESAR’S MURDER AMONG THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RUINS!

IDES OF MARCH: JULIUS CAESAR’S MURDER AMONG THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RUINS!

15 March is known to history as the “Ides of March”, the day when Julius Caesar was killed. The spot where the general fell in 44 BC is putatively identifed with what is known today as Largo di Torre Argentina, a lovely square in the heart of Rome.
This Sunday a few events will take place to remember a day which changed somehow the course of the Roman Republic.
First of all guided tours: from 9.45am to 4.30pm qualified guides will lead people through the ruins of Largo Argentina’s archaeological area. The tours will be both in Italian and English and will take about 40 minutes.
Second: at 12.00pm and 15.30pm a philologically rigorous reenactment of Julius Caesar murder will be set up in three scenes:
1) Mark Antony, Cato, Cicero, senators and tribunes have a meeting at the Senate and at end of it they declare Caesar a public enemy of Rome;
2) Caesar arrives to the Curia and meets the haruspex Spurinna, who had warned him: “Caesar, beware the Ides of March”. It follows his assassination with twenty-three stab wounds;
3) Brutus and Mark Antony hold a funeral speech to honor Caesar at the Roman Forum (the speech is taken from Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”).
For the time of each of the two 45-minute reenactments guided tours will be stopped.
No admission fee is requested to enjoy the tours and the reenactments!
Largo di Torre Argentina is at just 10 minutes bus journey from Termini station or walking distance from the main sights: ask our staff at Yes Hotel for more details!

DIGITAL CELEBRATIONS OF AUGUSTUS

DIGITAL CELEBRATIONS OF AUGUSTUS

To commemorate 2000 years after Augustus’ death (the great emperor passed away on 19 August 14 AD) Rome had settled two majestic exhibitions which will still be running for some time even in 2015. The reason behind these long-lasting celebrations has to be found in the deep social and political changes that Augustus’ governance brought to the Roman domain, marking its official shift from the status of republic to empire.
The first of the two is mainly a colossal digital expo which, through the most sophisticated interactive technologies, offers a conceptual itineray developing across 4 cities formerly part of the Roman Empire: Amsterdam, Sarajevo, Alexandria of Egypt and Rome of course. Each of them is currently hosting a branch of the joint exhibit project called “Keys to Rome”. It’s not a random choice: visitors will approach Roman Empire history from four different points of view corresponding to the former four different corners of Augustus’ reign.
The second exhibit highlights instead the impact of Augustus’ rule on the traditional Roman culture. One of the most meaningful changes he introduced has to do with time calculation: he didn’t hesitate to add new festivities and events to the Roman calendar even for propaganda purposes.
We shortlisted for you few info on these two events:
“KEYS TO ROME – THE CITY OF AUGUSTUS”, Trajan’s Markets, 9 am- 7 pm (Mon closed)
“AUGUSTUS REVOLUTION”, Roman National Museum at Palazzo Massimo, 9 am – 7.45 pm (Mon closed).
Yes Hotel is at walking distance from Palazzo Massimo, and at short bus journey from Trajan’s Market!